Grief After Suicide – Part 3

The pain of grief can often cause you to want to withdraw from others and retreat into your shell.  But having the face-to-face support of other people is vital to healing from loss.  Even if you’re not comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving.  While sharing your loss can make the burden of grief easier to carry, that doesn’t mean that every time you interact with friends and family, you need to talk about your loss.  Comfort can also come from just being around others who care about you.  The key is not to isolate yourself.

 Finding support after a loss

 Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient.  Rather than avoiding them, draw friends and loved ones close, spend time together face to face, and accept the assistance that’s offered.  Often, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on, help with funeral arrangements, or just someone to hang out with.  If you don’t feel you have anyone you can regularly connect with in person, it’s never too late to build new friendships.

Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide.  Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace.  If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community.

Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help.  To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers.  You can also search on the website of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention for a support group near you.

Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, find a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling.  An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving.

Using social media for grief support

Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support.  As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences.  Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss.

Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well.  Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account.  This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice.  Worse, memorial pages can also attract Internet trolls.  There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on memorial pages.

To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial.  It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time.

When grief doesn’t go away

As time passes following a significant loss, such as the death of a loved one, it’s normal for feelings of sadness, numbness, or anger to gradually ease.  These and other difficult emotions become less intense as you begin to accept the loss and start to move forward with your life.  However, if you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression.

Complicated grief

The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage.  If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief.  Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning.  You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships.

Symptoms of complicated grief include:

  • Intense longing and yearning for your deceased loved one
  • Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one
  • Denial of the death or sense of disbelief
  • Imagining that your loved one is alive
  • Searching for your deceased loved one in familiar places
  • Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one
  • Extreme anger or bitterness over your loss
  • Feeling that life is empty or meaningless

When to seek professional help for grief

If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief, talk to a mental health professional right away.  Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide.  But treatment can help you get better.

Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you:

  1. Feel like life isn’t worth living
  2. Wish you had died with your loved one
  3. Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it
  4. Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks
  5. Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss
  6. Are unable to perform your normal daily activities

The information in this article is not intended to replace professional help for those who need it.  If you’d like to chat with someone to help you understand what you’re experiencing and determine whether professional help is necessary, message us at m.me/callforbackup.org/ and one of our specialists will be happy to connect with you.  If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts and are in crisis now, please call someone to be with you, and then call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1(800) 273- TALK (8255).

 

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